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Article
March 1946

DERMATOPHYTOSIS AND OTHER FORMS OF INTERTRIGINOUS DERMATITIS OF THE FEET: A Comparison of Therapeutic Methods

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; BALTIMORE

From the Laboratory of Dermatological Research, University of Pennsylvania, assisted by a grant from the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry, American Medical Association.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;53(3):213-225. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510320003001
Abstract

BOTH in civil life and in the armed forces, the control of those conditions of the feet which are commonly diagnosed as "dermatophytosis" has long been a problem. Even when "cured" they are likely to recur. They sometimes incapacitate. The incidence in college students is 50 to 70 per cent. Youth, hot climates and sweaty feet are predisposing factors. Today, in the army and navy, 8 per cent of hospital admissions in the United States are for dermatoses in general, and dermatophytosis ranks in incidence second only to contact dermatitis. In the foreign field the figure would doubtless be larger, and reports from the South Pacific area indicate that these dermatoses are outstandingly severe there. In short, there is acute need for a satisfactory means for keeping the feet of fighting men in good condition, in which connection intertriginous dermatitis poses a large problem.

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