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Article
March 1946

PENICILLIN IN TOPICAL TREATMENT OF PYOGENIC INFECTIONS OF THE SKIN: Clinical and Laboratory Observations

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; SANITARY CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;53(3):234-242. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510320024004
Abstract

THIS study was designed to correlate the clinical results of topical penicillin therapy for a group of superficial infections of the skin, with the sensitivity to penicillin in vitro of the organisms isolated. The widespread topical use of penicillin makes such a study desirable. Because penicillin is relatively non-irritating to the skin and non-sensitizing and because of its dramatically prompt action in favorable cases, the drug is admirably suited for the topical treatment of superficial pyogenic infections. Penicillin incorporated into ointment base is sufficiently stable if properly stored. Indeed, the rate of deterioration of the ointment is such that it may even be kept at room temperature for several weeks without serious reduction of activity.1 Better knowledge of its stability permits extending the use of pencillin for topical application among patients whose access to refrigeration facilities is limited.

Our investigation was undertaken at the

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