[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1946

TEMPORARY UNILATERAL LOSS OF VISION ASSOCIATED WITH IODERMA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;54(1):29-32. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510360033004
Abstract

IODIDES enter the body by ingestion, injection, inhalation, absorption from various body cavities and orifices where they have been introduced for therapeutic or diagnostic reasons and by absorption through the intact or broken skin by way of the pores.

The iodide ion replaces chlorine from various chlorine compounds. The displaced chlorine is then excreted. This is a reversible mechanism, since an increase of chlorine intake will by mass action free the iodine ions, which are then excreted. Bromine acts in a similar way by replacing chlorine and iodine and vice versa. This is the basis for the modern treatment of both iodism and bromism.

Iodides circulating in the system rapidly reach all the tissues and structures of the body. In the blood, iodides are chiefly found in the plasma, there being but small amounts in the blood corpuscles. The thyroid gland is the chief depot for iodides normally.

×