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Article
July 1946

PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS OF LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Veterans Administration Facility, Sheridan, Wyo. (Captain Pisetsky is now at the Veterans Administration Facility, Roseburg, Ore.)

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;54(1):33-38. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510360037005
Abstract

FEW STUDIES have been completed on the psychosomatic implications of dermatologic disorders, especially those of a disfiguring nature. It is fairly obvious that cutaneous diseases have a definite socioeconomic significance. If the disease assumes the form of a mild reaction the social response is minimal, but if it is widespread and elicits a distinctly negative response akin to abhorrence the factor of social rejection plays a more determining role. Extremely disfiguring diseases of the face or the presenting part of the body, such as lupus vulgaris, leprosy and syphilis and cancers, are of more infrequent occurrence. It is true that deformities of the face and its appendages occur traumatically either in civilian or in military practice, but plastic surgery generally insures a modicum of repair, and with the use of artificial prosthetics to the disfigurements there can be imparted a high degree of social acceptability. There are,

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