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Article
August 1946

ACUTE LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS DISSEMINATUS TREATED WITH PENICILLIN: Report of a Case

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;54(2):197-199. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510370081006
Abstract

ALTHOUGH the etiologic agent of lupus erythematosus disseminatus is still a matter of controversy, there are some investigators who believe that there is sufficient evidence at the present time to justify the opinion that this disease is caused by streptococci or their products. Streptococci have been isolated from the blood in a number of cases of the disseminated type and O'Leary,1 among others, is of the opinion that those micro-organisms are of etiologic importance.

If this opinion is correct, it stands to reason that the administration of penicillin should be beneficial to a patient with lupus erythematosus disseminatus. It might be well to recall at this point that similar reasoning was employed when the sulfonamide compounds were first introduced into therapy, and although encouraging results following the oral administration of these compounds have been reported the results in general were disappointing.2

Having tried the various known

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