[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1946

ALLERGIC DERMATOSES COMPLICATING PENICILLIN THERAPY

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;54(3):292-299. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510380039005
Abstract

TOXIC reactions following penicillin therapy in human beings are uncommon. Few significant complications were noted in the several large series of cases1 reported in the current literature. The reactions to the drug itself are usually of an allergic nature and are then manifested clinically as some type of dermatitis. The manner in which one is exposed to the penicillin, whether externally or parenterally, will determine within limits the nature of the dermatitic response. There are three clinical types of reaction to the commercial penicillin: (1) urticaria, (2) the erythematovesicular group of reactions and (3) contact dermatitis. The first two follow the injection route only, while contact dermatitis occurs only after external exposure. This report will be devoted to a discussion of these three types and a presentation of illustrative cases.

URTICARIA

Urticaria, the most frequently seen complication, is the result of a mechanism analogous to that

×