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Article
October 1946

ECZEMATOUS AND PIGMENTARY LICHENOID DERMATITIS: Atypical Lichen Planus; Preliminary Report

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;54(4):377-396. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510390002001
Abstract

SEVERAL surprises greeted the military dermatologist when he first saw and tried to treat patients with "infectious eczematoid dermatitis" from the Southwest Pacific Area. The eruption was resistant; even mild eczematous lesions were characterized by exacerbations; purplish to almost coal black splotches of hyperpigmentation were common; exfoliative dermatitis was not uncommon; severe unexpected complications were not rare; follicular hyperkeratoses were the rule and one group of patients had a disease which closely simulated lichen planus with lesions of the mucous membrane and skin. It seemed entirely likely that in all the cases there was a common denominator. It is my desire to describe the various manifestations of the disease, to record my observations in over 300 cases and to comment on its causation.

This disease, protean in its manifestations, was at first thought to arise only in the New Guinea Area. Cases have now been observed also

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