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Article
November 1946

CONTACT DERMATITIS FROM PENICILLIN: The Source of the Antigen

Author Affiliations

DETROIT; CHICAGO

From the Division of Allergy, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University School of Medicine, and the Plant Physician's Department of Abbott Laboratories.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;54(5):517-523. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510400023003
Abstract

ALLERGY to penicillin has been the subject of many recent reports. Various types of reactions are recorded which may be classified under the heading of hypersensitivity. The most common allergic response described is urticaria.1 In most instances this resembles a serum sickness type of reaction and does not interfere with the continuation of treatment. In a few cases, more severe reactions have necessitated prompt cessation of therapy. Another type of reaction is a vesicular or bullous eruption occurring shortly after the onset of treatment, which appears to be in some manner related to a previous fungous infection of the skin.2 Contact dermatitis is a third manifestation frequently attributed to penicillin.3 In addition to these three types of allergy, which comprise the majority of the reactions reported, a tuberculin type of response following a single intradermal injection,4 and reactions of the Arthus type

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