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Article
November 1946

OBSERVATIONS ON THE CAUSE AND TRANSMISSION OF GRANULOMA INGUINALE

Author Affiliations

Passed Assistant Surgeon, United States Public Health Service WASHINGTON, D. C.

From the Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine, Georgetown University School of Medicine (Dr. Butts), and the Rapid Treatment Center, Gallinger Municipal Hospital (Dr. Olansky).

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1946;54(5):524-530. doi:10.1001/archderm.1946.01510400030004
Abstract

IN 1937 studies on 8 cases of granuloma inguinale were reported by one of us.1 In that report it was suggested that a spirochete and a short stout coccobacillary rod might be etiologically related to the disease. It was also suggested in the same report that the disease might be transmitted by means of the pubic louse, Phthirus pubis (Linn.).

It was not until 1943 that studies were resumed along these lines. In the present series all the patients were Negroes, and, with but 1 exception (case 9), all were admitted to Gallinger Municipal Hospital for diagnosis and treatment.

Three pertinent observations appear to have been demonstrated or suggested by this report.

The first observation is that in 10 of the 11 cases (91 per cent) in which the pathognomonic leishmania bodies were found in biopsy material a history of infestation with P. pubis preceding the appearance of

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