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Article
January 1947

ICHTHYOSIFORM CHANGES OF THE SKIN ASSOCIATED WITH INTERNAL DISEASES

Author Affiliations

Late Surgeon Lieutenant Commander, Royal Navy; Lieutenant, Polish Army Medical Corps EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND

From the Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Edinburgh, and the Polish School of Medicine, Edinburgh.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;55(1):28-36. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520010032003
Abstract

Most cases of ichthyosis are congenital in origin. A hereditary tendency has been noted repeatedly. Gray1 postulates that the horny overgrowth is an attempt to compensate for the protection usually supplied by the oily secretions.

Acquired ichthyosis is rare but cases do undoubtedly occur. Such were described by Crocker,2 who also mentioned the ichthyosis which is liable to afflict the Piper methysticum chewers of the Sandwich Islands. Little additional information is given by the Suttons,3 who quote from Crocker.

Trophic changes, consisting of dryness of the skin, atrophy, hyperkeratosis and alopecia, are seen not infrequently in Hodgkin's disease. Ronchese4 has described such a case. An ichthyosiform atrophy of the skin developed in a patient with lymphadenoma while he was in apparently good health, eleven months before his death. The changes took only six weeks to mature and were widespread. The cutaneous surface became rhomboidal scales with

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