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Article
March 1947

CLINICAL USE OF A NEW ANTIHISTAMINIC COMPOUND (PYRIBENZAMINE) IN CERTAIN CUTANEOUS DISORDERS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;55(3):309-321. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520030002001
Abstract

IN 1927 Lewis1 postulated that allergic reactions depend on or are produced by the liberation of a histamine-like substance (H substance) at the site of the reaction. Most investigators are of the opinion that histamine and the H substance are identical or nearly so. Many investigators have sought ways and means of neutralizing this H substance and thus preventing the sequence of events that occurs in allergic reactions. In 1932 Hill and Martin2 reviewed the literature on antihistaminic substances and methods of preventing anaphylactic shock that had been described up to that time. None of these methods were effective. Since then, however, rapid progress has been made along this line.

Fourneau and Bovet, in 1933,3 pointed out that the drug thymoxyethyldiethylamine (929 F) had the ability to counteract the effects of histamine both in vitro and in vivo. Subsequently, this phenolic ether and others were studied for

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