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Article
April 1947

LICHEN SCLEROSUS ET ATROPHICUS WITH BULLOUS LESIONS AND EXTENSIVE INVOLVEMENT: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Dermatological Department and the Pathological Department of the Barnard Free Skin and Cancer Hospital and the Washington University School of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;55(4):433-440. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520040002001
Abstract

A CASE of lichen sclerosus et atrophicus is presented because of the extensive involvement of the skin and because of the numerous bullous lesions.

The clinical and pathologic findings in lichen sclerosus et atrophicus were authoritatively presented by Montgomery and Hill1 in 1940. They observed 46 patients with the disease and succeeded in distinguishing the clinical and histologic changes from those of morphea guttata and lichen planus atrophicus.

The characteristic clinical feature of lichen sclerosus et atrophicus is a white papule, which may be discrete or one of a group forming a plaque. On the surface of each papule is a dark plug, resembling a comedo, or a tiny depression which is the site of a former plug. Atrophy may occur in the later stages, with parchment-like wrinkling and greater prominence of the plugs.

According to Montgomery and Hill1 the characteristic histologic features consist of relative and absolute

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