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Article
April 1947

EXPERIENCES IN MILITARY DERMATOLOGY: Their Interpretation in Plans for Improved General Medical Care

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Dr. Pillsbury was formerly senior consultant in dermatology in the European Theater of Operations, Army of the United States (1942 to 1945).; From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.; Dr. Livingood has been successively chief of dermatology service, Indiantown Gap Station Hospital (1941 to 1942); chief of dermatology service, Twentieth General Hospital, Assam, India (1943 to 1945), and consultant in dermatology, Office of the Surgeon General (March to December 1945).

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;55(4):441-462. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520040010002
Abstract

THE ARMED forces of the United States have completed one of the largest experiments in group medical practice that has ever been undertaken. Regardless of some errors which were made in scientific methods, in planning and in organization, it is believed that the history of the medical services will demonstrate conclusively that the individual soldier and sailor received medical and surgical care of a high standard. It is our purpose in this paper to assess, insofar as our individual experiences will allow, the successes and failures which dermatology, as one of the medical specialties, contributed to the over-all mission of prevention and cure of disease in the United States Army.

Official histories dealing with various aspects of the Medical Department of the Army will appear in due course. It is believed that these will be written objectively and honestly. They will furnish much information which should be of interest and

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