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Article
April 1947

ROLE OF FOOD ALLERGY IN ECZEMATOID DERMATITIS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Dr. Flood is now with the Robert Packer Hospital and Guthrie Clinic, Sayre, Pa., and Dr. Perry is in the Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;55(4):493-506. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520040062006
Abstract

THE TERM "eczematoid dermatitis" is used in this paper to denote a group of somewhat heterogeneous dermatoses of various morphologic types which are eczematous in character and resistant to treatment and do not belong to any other, more clearly delineated, clinical picture. It is well recognized that multiple etiologic factors often contribute to the production of eczematoid dermatitis (Stokes1). The present paper deals with one of these factors, namely, food allergy, which we have demonstrated to be the primary factor in a number of cases. Thirteen cases in which the offending foods were discovered by trial or elimination diets are reported. Ingestion of these foods caused an exacerbation of the dermatitis within twenty-four hours. Elimination of these foods was followed by prompt healing of the cutaneous lesions.

Approximately half the patients referred because of cutaneous diseases to a general hospital in the southeastern United States suffered from eczematoid dermatitis

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