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Article
May 1947

CONGENITAL ABSENCE OF THE VALVES IN THE VEINS AS A CAUSE OF VARICOSITIES

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Michigan Medical School.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;55(5):639-643. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520050041005
Abstract

THERE is little doubt that thrombophlebitis is the commonest cause of varicose veins. However, this should not make one oblivious to other factors which may also produce varices. It is becoming more evident that congenital defects of the veins or their valves are not uncommon and may explain why a young person without previous history of phlebitis or thrombophlebitis occasionally may have extensive varicose veins, with associated hemostatic dermatitis or even ulceration.

In 1936 Weber1 stated:

In some such cases "congenital varicose veins" [are]... connected with and constitute a part of [a]... developmental disturbance of growth, and [are]... associated with a telangiectatic or other haemangiectatic naevus-formation.

Such "congenital varicose veins" are really only large or giant veins of developmental origin, but are not, strictly speaking, true varicose veins, i. e., veins with the special alteration in the vessel-walls... due to insufficiency of vein-valves and chronic distension of postural origin....

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