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Article
July 1947

GRANULOMA INGUINALE TREATED WITH STREPTOMYCIN: Report of Three Cases

Author Affiliations

DUBUQUE, IOWA; Senior Assistant Surgeon, United States Public Health Service; Senior Assistant Surgeon (R), United States Public Health Service; Senior Surgeon, United States Public Health Service CHICAGO

From the Chicago Intensive Treatment Center, Venereal Disease Control Program, Chicago Board of Health in cooperation with the United States Public Health Service.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;56(1):1-6. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520070004001
Abstract

EVER since 1905, when Donovan1 described the peculiar intracellular and extracellular encapsulated organisms which he found in fresh spreads taken from ulcerative lesions of granuloma inguinale, the nature of the Donovan body has excited great interest. Though Donovan himself expressed the opinion that the organism is a protozoan, its position in the field of toxonomy was a moot point, eliciting much labor but little light, until Anderson, DeMonbreun and Goodpasture2 successfully cultivated the Donovan body in the yolk of chick embryos. According to these investigators the organism is a bacillus, for which they proposed the generic name "Donovania" and the specific name "granulomatis."

The therapy of the disease was ineffective until 1913, when intravenous administration of antimony and potassium tartrate was introduced by de Beaurepaire, Aragão and Vianna.3 This drug was enthusiastically acclaimed by Low and Newham,4 Pardo,5 and Randall, Small and Belk.6

Fraser

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