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Article
October 1947

DISSEMINATED ULCERATING SPOROTRICHOSIS WITH WIDESPREAD VISCERAL INVOLVEMENT: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Departments of Dermatology, Bacteriology and Pathology, Cincinnati General Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;56(4):523-528. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520100119017
Abstract

A REVIEW of the American literature on sporotrichosis has revealed few cases with visceral involvement. The present report is of a case in which there were widespread visceral lesions.

The number of cases of sporotrichosis reported in this country now total over 200, the majority being from the Mississippi Valley region. The organism is widely distributed as a saprophyte on vegetation, and Foerster1 has emphasized the occupational hazard of sporotrichosis among farmers and horticulturists and the importance of the barberry shrub as a source of infection.

Sporotrichosis is a disease with several clinical types, which are usually classified as follows:

  1. Localized type: This is the commonest form in the United States. A primary ulcerated lesion, or chancre, appears usually on the hands or forearms and is followed after several days by the development of circumscribed hard painless subcutaneous nodules, which frequently ulcerate, along the course of the regional lymphatic

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