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Article
November 1947

OCCUPATIONAL PIGMENTARY CHANGES IN THE SKIN

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;56(5):592-600. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520110038006
Abstract

JEGHERS1 stated that according to Edwards and Duntley the normal color of the skin is due to (1) the light reflection properties of its structure plus the cutaneous pigments, (2) melanin, (3) melanoid, (4) carotene and (5) hemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin.

Occupational exposures which produce disturbances in these five color factors of the skin may result in occupational pigmentary changes. Occupational pigmentation of the skin may consist of (1) an excess of melanin and melanoid, (2) deposits of metallic substances in the skin (tattooing) and (3) dyeing of the skin either from external application of the dye or deposition of the dye in the skin after ingestion.

OCCUPATIONAL MELANODERMA  The occupational causes of excessive formation of pigment in the skin are (1) excessive exposure to sunlight or actinic rays, (2) exposure to coal tar (the heavy coal tar distillates and coal tar pitch), (3) exposure to crude petroleum and residues

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