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Article
December 1947

SUPPURATIVE RINGWORM CONTRACTED FROM CATTLE

Author Affiliations

LEWISBURG, PA.; NEW YORK

From the Dr. S. Lewis Ziegler Memorial Infirmary, Bucknell University, and the Department of Dermatology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;56(6):780-793. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520120068007
Abstract

DURING the past three years, we have observed a series of 23 cases of deep suppurative ringworm infections which were contracted from cattle. In the large majority of the cases the organisms were difficult to isolate and produced slowly growing, glabrous colonies which were identified as belonging to the faviform group of trichophyta. In a few cases the rapidly growing, fluffy colonies of the gypseum trichophyta were obtained.

Since the lesions were of a deep suppurative character—a type of trichophyton infection which, according to Conant and his colleagues,1 is rarely seen in this country—and since the incidence of the transmission of ringworm infection from livestock to farm workers is not generally known or recognized, we feel that these cases should be reported. Also the high incidence of the faviform trichophyta observed in these infections and the difficulty encountered in their isolation and identification emphasize the importance of a study

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