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Article
December 1947

SULFONAMIDE SENSITIVITY AND PROPHYLAXIS AGAINST VENEREAL DISEASE

Author Affiliations

LITTLE ROCK, ARK.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1947;56(6):869-871. doi:10.1001/archderm.1947.01520120157018
Abstract

The soldier in the recent conflict was exposed to sulfonamide drugs in many forms in his appearances at the unit dispensaries. The various forms of toxic cutaneous reactions to these drugs have been adequately dealt with by Cohen, Thomas and Kalisch,1 Weiner,2 Ellis3 and others, and the following case is reported in order to show that small amounts of the drug may set off irritating and extensive reactions.

Prophylaxis against venereal disease as practiced in the army was of several types. The "station" type of prophylaxis at the dispensaries consisted of local use of soap and water, intraurethral instillation of strong protein silver solution and local application of ointment of mild mercurous chloride. For areas where station facilities were not convenient the soldier was furnished with an individual chemical prophylactic kit. The earlier types of these packets contained two tubes of silver trinitrophenolate and ointment of mild

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