[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1948

URTICARIAL REACTION INDUCED IN THE DOG BY INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF SORBITOL MONOLAURATE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

Research Fellow of the American Gastro Enterological Association.; From the Department of Physiology, Northwestern University and the Department of Clinical Science, University of Illinois.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1948;58(6):659-674. doi:10.1001/archderm.1948.01520250003001
Abstract

DURING the course of experiments on parenteral nutrition in the dog, H. C. Meng and Smith Freeman1 observed that the slow intravenous injection of a fat emulsion, stabilized with sorbitol monolaurate (tween 20®), was associated with the development of urticaria. This observation prompted us to undertake a study of the changes which might be related to the development of urticaria, since no other pure substance is known to us which on intravenous injection will consistently cause urticaria. The chemical does not cause urticaria when given orally but does so when introduced intradermally, without previous sensitization of the animal.

In order for one to determine the relation of this experimental urticaria in the dog to that which is produced in man, it will be necessary to review briefly what is known regarding the nature of urticaria in man.

SUMMARY OF KNOWLEDGE OF THE URTICARIAL REACTION  The urticarial reaction consists essentially

×