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Article
January 1949

PRESENT STATUS OF QUINACRINE (ATABRINE) DERMATITIS: Report of Six Cases

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH

From the Department of Dermatology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1949;59(1):16-21. doi:10.1001/archderm.1949.01520260020003
Abstract

MANY physicians and the majority of laymen apparently believe that a fungus is responsible for almost every disease of the skin acquired by members of the armed forces in a tropical climate. In a similarly uncritical manner, the term "jungle rot" is often associated with a supposed fungous infection of tropical origin. The expression was coined by American soldiers in the Pacific Islands and was used to indicate any severe, refractory disease of the skin that occurred there. In my opinion, such conditions that I saw in the Southwest Pacific area resulted from an intolerance to quinacrine (atabrine). Livingood, former dermatologic consultant to the Surgeon General, has expressed agreement.1

What is the present dermatologic condition of the veterans who have had quinacrine dermatitis? This question has been asked repeatedly. The following query was sent by a large manufacturing concern to the Industrial Hygiene Foundation of America: "At the present time,

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