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Article
September 1949

PARAFAVUS RESTRICTED TO THE SCROTUM: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Michigan Medical School.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1949;60(3):435-436. doi:10.1001/archderm.1949.01530030131016
Abstract

Although most dermatologists in this country know of favus and are familiar with its manifestations, relatively few of them have been afforded an opportunity to see or study a case of parafavus or pseudofavus.

Two views of the scrotum, showing numerous scutula. These were composed exclusively of filaments and spores.

Favus, a recalcitrant, inflammatory fungus-instigated cutaneous eruption which may involve the scalp, glabrous skin and nails, is endemic in Eastern Europe. Yellow, cup-shaped crusts, or scutula, are a spectacular, though not invariable, feature of the disease. Achorion schoenleini is the classic etiologic agent, the name Achorion having originally been assigned to a limited number of species of fungi which produced cups.1

Weidman has pointed out that parafavus, as contrasted with true favus, is accompanied with scutula in small numbers, these usually being confined to one region of the body, such as the lid, scrotum, ear or back, and that

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