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Article
October 1949

RELAPSING FEBRILE NODULAR PANNICULITIS (WEBER-CHRISTIAN DISEASE): Review of the Literature and Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1949;60(4):570-596. doi:10.1001/archderm.1949.01530040098007
Abstract

RELAPSING febrile nodular panniculitis, or Weber-Christian disease, is characterized by recurring bouts of fever, associated with the appearance of crops of subcutaneous nodules, varying from the size of a pea to several inches in diameter, usually on the thighs and arms and frequently on the abdomen, back and legs. These manifestations may remain separate or become, by confluence, indurated areas of subcutaneous fat. The nodules, which may be either painless or tender to touch, are frequently erythematous and raised above the surface of the normal skin. The pathologic changes appear to be necrosis of the subcutaneous fat, with infiltration by lipophages and eventually fibrosis. Over a period of months the nodules may slowly regress, leaving shallow or deep-pitted areas covered by normal skin.1 As a rule, no pathologic changes are observed in the other systems of the body, although death from the disease per se has been

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