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Article
November 1949

USE OF REPELLENTS IN CLINICAL DERMATOLOGY: General Principles

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1949;60(5_PART_I):777-780. doi:10.1001/archderm.1949.01530050139012
Abstract

AMONG the advances in preventive medicine in the last world war were the detailed studies in the chemical control of insects. As yet, the practicing physician, as compared with the military physician, does not appear to be fully aware of the possibilities for the control of insects, especially the disease-bearing types. This chemical control, in general, falls into two phases: insecticidal and repellent activity.

The development of insecticides is well known from the advances in the preparations of pyrethrins and DDT (2,2-bis [p-chlorophenyl]-1,1,1-trichloroethane) and its newer analogues, such as DDD (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-[p-chlorophenyl]-ethane) and methoxychlor (1,1,1trichloro-2,2-bis [p-methoxyphenyl]-ethane. Perhaps less is known about the developments of new insecticidal materials, which include such substances as gammexane® (hexachlorocyclohexane), velsicol 1068® (also called chlordan), hexaethyltetraphosphate, piperine compounds, parathion (0,0-diethyl-0-p-nitrophenyl thiophosphate), very toxic, phenyl cellosolve® (ethylene glycol monophenyl ether) and eura® (10 per cent crotonyl-N-ethyl-ortho-toluidide).1 Dermatologists should be interested also in the

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