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Article
January 1950

A THEORY OF THE PATHOGENESIS OF ORDINARY HUMAN BALDNESS

Author Affiliations

Research Fellow, Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis; Assistant Resident in Psychiatry, University of Chicago Clinics CHICAGO

From the Division of Psychiatry, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(1):34-48. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530080040004
Abstract

BALDNESS in men is such a common occurrence that it has almost come to be accepted as a normal phenomenon. This view has been encouraged by the attributing of the condition either to irrevocable heredity or to the ubiquitous condition of seborrhea. Understandably, however, much thought and investigation have been expended in an attempt to comprehend and reverse this blow to masculine pride. Work on the subject has been carried out almost exclusively by dermatologists. A review of the most authoritative present day dermatologic textbooks indicates, however, that the problem is still far from being solved.

We, as psychiatrists, were initially drawn to this problem by observations on facial expression. These observations, together with certain significant contributions to the literature which were apparently hitherto overlooked, led to the formulation of what is offered as a comprehensive explanation of the pathogenesis of ordinary human baldness.

CRITICAL REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

The literature dealing with the problem of ordinary

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