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Article
January 1950

ARTERIOSCLEROSIS OBLITERANS AS A CAUSE OF ULCERS OF THE LEG

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University Hospitals, the State University of Iowa.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(1):80-88. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530080086008
Abstract

CHRONIC ulcers of the leg are a perennial problem in charity institutions. As one reads the literature on ulcers one gets the impression that most of these lesions are caused by varicose veins, thrombophlebitis, lymphatic stasis and similar disturbances of the nonarterial circulation, producing chronic stasis and finally ulceration. In a continuing study of ulcers of the leg, particularly their treatment,1 it seemed to us that a large percentage of these ulcers were not caused by stasis, and so, about three years ago, we decided to study the peripheral arterial circulation in all patients with ulcers of the leg. Of 52 cases studied since then we found 10, or about 20 per cent, in which the chief, if not the only, cause of the ulceration was diminished arterial circulation due to obliterating arteriosclerosis.

Many years ago, Eloesser2 emphasized the multiplicity of factors causing ulcers of the

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