[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.172.195.49. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1950

PITYRIASIS ROSEA ACCOMPANIED WITH BELL'S PALSY: LOUIS G. JEKEL, M.D. PHOENIX, ARIZ.

Author Affiliations

PHOENIX, ARIZ.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(1):118. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530080124018
Abstract

Mild, and even severe, constitutional reactions accompanying pityriasis rosea have been reported many times, but involvement of the nervous system is rarely recorded. Von Szabóky,1 who did refer to nervous manifestations, merely generalized on the subject by mentioning sweating, trembling, pallor and redness, headache and exaggerated reflexes.

Therefore, a case of pityriasis rosea accompanied with a unilateral paralysis of a facial nerve (Bell's palsy) is considered worthy of a report.

C. F., a 15 year old white schoolgirl, first became ill with the common cold, accompanying which was an unusually severe headache. Three days later there appeared an eruption consisting of one large spot and several smaller spots on the right side of the trunk. The eruption was symptomless. A day later the patient noticed a peculiar feeling in the left side of the face, with inability to smile normally and inability to close the left eye. There

×