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Article
February 1950

REEVALUATION OF WELTMANN SERUM COAGULATION REACTION IN SYPHILIS AND VARIOUS DERMATOSES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Graduate Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, service of Dr. Donald M. Pillsbury.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(2):285-296. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530090115011
Abstract

THE WELTMANN serum coagulation reaction is a nonspecific laboratory test in which coagulation takes place in a certain number of mixtures of blood serum and varying concentrations of calcium chloride, in the presence of heat. The test is of value in differentiating exudative from fibrotic processes and in prognosticating the course and evolution of many diseases. It was originated by Oscar Weltmann1 in 1930 and immediately found recognition in the world's medical literature. In this country, Kraemer2 was the first to call attention to the test. Kraemer's article was soon followed by the work of Levinson and Klein,3 Dees,4 Scherlis and Levy5 and many others in evaluation of the test from different aspects. However, only slight interest by the dermatologist has been shown in the Weltmann serum coagulation reaction, only one paper on the subject having appeared in the Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology

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