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Article
March 1950

CUTANEOUS GRANULOMA FOLLOWING LACERATION BY FLUORESCENT LIGHT BULBS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; WHITE PLAINS, N. Y.; NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the New York University Post-Graduate Medical School, Dr. Marion B. Sulzberger, chairman, and the Skin and Cancer Unit of University Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(3):401-406. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530100045005
Abstract

IT IS KNOWN that beryllium compounds can produce acute pneumonitis,1 dermatitis2 and chronic granulomatous changes in the lungs, lymph nodes and skin.3 Until recently, case reports have pertained to workers employed in the processing of beryllium ore and in such industries as the manufacture of fluorescent lamps, the casting of beryllium copper alloys, the production of electric signs and the manufacture of special ceramics. With the widespread use of fluorescent light bulbs, it is apparent that the hazard has extended to the general public. Chronic granulomas appearing at the sites of superficial or deep lacerations caused by broken fluorescent light tubes have been reported.4

Fluorescent lamps are lined with a coating composed of the beryllium phosphor, zinc manganese beryllium silicate, containing from 0.5 to 2 per cent beryllium.

We are reporting 2 additional instances of cutaneous granuloma following laceration of the skin with

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