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Article
April 1950

RELATIONSHIPS OF SUNLIGHT, COMPLEXION AND HEREDITY TO SKIN CARCINOGENESIS

Author Affiliations

SANTA MONICA, CALIF.

From the Division of Dermatology and Syphilology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Southern California, and the Los Angeles County Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(4):589-610. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530110055004
Abstract

UNNA ([1894] cited by Blum1) is generally credited with being the first to point out that prolonged exposure to sunlight might give rise to malignant tumors of the skin. Hyde (1906),2 writing "On the Influence of Light in the Production of Cancer of the Skin," brought up the question of "whether actinic rays of light unfavorably influence not all but certain sensitive skin at certain ages of the body, in the direction of the epitheliomatous metamorphosis." He pretty well eliminated heat, wind and frostbite, for example, as causes of skin cancer, by statistics on the prevalence of cancer of the skin in various occupations and in various geographic locations, and concluded: "It would seem that exposure to light and to light exclusively, is the special stimulant provoking a certain proportion of skins to the metamorphosis that means carcinoma." He recognized the role of pigmentation, "especially

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