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Article
May 1950

RED FLUORESCENCE OF URINE IN WOOD'S LIGHT AS AID IN OFFICE DIAGNOSIS OF PORPHYRIA

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Dermatology and Chemical Divisions, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(5):853-854. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530120144014
Abstract

The usual methods of examination for porphyrins in the urine demand considerable time and effort on the part of the physician and the technician. No fast reliable method for quantitatively estimating coproporphyrin in the urine has been devised, but the significance of increased excretion of this pigment has been found to be unimportant in the dermatoses1 though of importance and interest in the anemias, hepatopathies and febrile disorders.

Porphyria, on the other hand, in which uroporphyrin, an abnormal porphyrin, is found in the urine, may be of great significance to dermatologists. With porphyria, one may see various dermatologic symptoms. Hydroa estivale, epidermolysis bullosa-like lesions, sclerodermatous eruptions, hypertrichosis and hyperpigmentation have been recognized to occur with porphyria. In addition, persons with porphyria not infrequently have gastrointestinal or neuropsychiatric complaints.

Study of several cases of porphyria has taught me that the diagnosis may be made in any dermatologist's

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