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Article
June 1950

FAVORABLE EFFECT OF HIGH ALTITUDE ON AMERICAN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS AND LEPROSY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Edward A. Oliver, M.D., chairman.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;61(6):984-995. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530130102016
Abstract

IN SOUTH America there are two well recognized types of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Uta, as shown in figure 1, occurs in the high, arid valleys of the Andes at altitudes of 3,000 to 8,000 feet (914 to 2,438 meters). This form of the disease resembles oriental sore, is benign and usually heals within one year with the formation of a scar. The mucous membranes are rarely involved.

On the other hand, mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, or espundia, as it is known in Peru, is found in the moist tropical regions with forests and luxuriant vegetation. One or more ulcers, which usually heal in time, may occur on the legs or arms. Twenty per cent of the patients later acquire ulcerating and mutilating lesions in the mouth and nose. Figure 2 shows a rare disseminated form of the disease. Involvement of the ears produces the characteristic mutilation known as "chicle sapper's ears."

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