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Article
July 1950

TREATMENT OF TINEA CAPITIS WITH ESTROGENIC HORMONES

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;62(1):58-65. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530140062006
Abstract

IT IS WELL known that fungous infections of the scalp tend to disappear spontaneously at about the time of puberty. Hormonal factors are most likely involved. This observation led to the use of an estrogenic substance in treatment of 11 patients by Lewis and Hopper in 1937.1 Each patient received an injection at intervals of from three to seven days, the initial dose being 500 and subsequent doses being 1,000 international units. A total of 5,500 to 17,500 units was given. These authors were unable to observe improvement following this therapy.

Because of the close relation known to exist between the pituitary gland and the gonads and because the secretions from these glands are known to play an important role in the bodily changes at puberty, treatment by means of the anterior pituitary—like gonadotropic substance from the urine of pregnant women was given in four

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