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Article
July 1950

CHAPPING OF THE SKIN ON RETURNING FROM THE TROPICS TO A COOLER AREA

Author Affiliations

OAKLAND, CALIF.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;62(1):141-142. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530140145017

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Abstract

World War II taught dermatologists that numerous diseases of the skin became worse in tropical and subtropical climates. It is not so generally realized that the skin may also suffer when a person returns from the tropics to a cooler and drier climate.

During the war in military personnel newly returned to the usually cool San Francisco Bay region from the warmer Pacific areas occasionally dermatitis developed. This appeared to be identical with, but often more acute and severer than, the pruritus hiemalis, or "winter itch," which is seen during the fall and winter months in temperate climates.

Since the war the same skin condition has been noted in civilian practice. It is probable that with the continued development of our Pacific Island bases and with increasing travel to the South and the Orient this dermatitis will be seen more frequently. It is characterized by dryness, redness and scaling. Vesiculation

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