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Article
October 1950

HISTOPATHOLOGIC RESPONSE OF THE SKIN TO GELFOAM

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

From the Dermatology Section and Pathology Department of the Wadsworth General Hospital, Veterans Administration Center, West Los Angeles, Calif., and the School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;62(4):548-555. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530170074009
Abstract

OBTAINING hemostasis is a basic surgical technic and has been achieved by many mechanical means. The more recent advances in the management of capillary and venous oozing have been the utilization of coagulating agents such as thrombin with an absorbable substance which will serve as a matrix for the formation of a clot.

During the recent world war the department of physical chemistry of the Harvard Medical School, through its large scale plasma fractionation program, produced a very significant contribution to hemostasis in the form of fibrin foam. Fibrin foam was utilized in experimental and neurosurgical procedures with gratifying results. It was found that fibrin foam soaked in thrombin possessed a hemostatic effect and produced a minimal amount of tissue reaction.

Foreseeing the possibility of the nationwide program of human blood donations coming to an end at the cessation of hostilities, with a consequent reduction in the

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