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Article
October 1950

TURNER'S SYNDROME ASSOCIATED WITH LICHEN PLANUS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Dermatology, Cook County Hospital.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1950;62(4):564-568. doi:10.1001/archderm.1950.01530170090013
Abstract

Turner1 first described a curious syndrome, observed in 7 female patients, consisting of webbing of the neck, cubitus valgus and infantilism. Sharpey-Schafer2 added a case, also in a female patient, of this triad and described the postmortem observations.

Recognition of webbing of the neck dates from 1883, when Kobylinski3 described it. Four cases were added by Frawley,4 all in females. Webbing occurs in the Klippel-Feil syndrome, also, apparently a commoner variety, but it is associated with synostosis of the cervical vertebrae with limitation of motion, and there is no infantilism. By these characteristics the Klippel-Feil syndrome is easily differentiated from Turner's. The cause of webbing is not known, but it has been thought to result from amniotic hands, to be a form of atavism or to be a developmental defect dating from the third month of fetal life, when the shoulders and head are in

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