[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1951

DERMATITIS REPENS: A REPORT OF TWO CASES WITH BACTERIOLOGIC STUDIES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology, Presbyterian Hospital, and the Vanderbilt Clinic, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1951;63(2):220-223. doi:10.1001/archderm.1951.01570020054006
Abstract

DERMATITIS repens was first described in 1888 by H. Radcliffe Crocker.1 In 1903 he drew a careful distinction between dermatitis repens and acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau. The distinction seemed somewhat forced, and later (1930) Barber stated that dermatitis repens and acrodermatitis continua were identical diseases that could conveniently be called acrodermatitis Perstans.2 The clinical description of dermatitis repens by Crocker is worth repeating in part:

An injury, often a trivial one, has been the exciting cause. Vesicles or bullae have appeared at the site of the injury and these have ruptured and the elevated epidermis has been thrown off, leaving a bright-red surface oozing a clear or slightly turbid fluid. The border of the denuded area is bounded by a collar of the epidermis which is raised up by subjacent fluid, clear or turbid, and is sodden and irregular. Sometimes extension takes place by the continued detachment of

×