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Article
February 1951

PALMAR PORE PATTERNS: THEIR SIGNIFICANCE IN THE ABSORPTION OF DYES

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1951;63(2):228-231. doi:10.1001/archderm.1951.01570020062008
Abstract

WHEN METHYLENE blue and other dyes are introduced into the human skin by iontophoresis, the pores of the sweat ducts and the follicle openings become stained.1 It has been postulated that the pore pattern indicates penetration of the dye into the sweat duct.2 A similar conclusion was reached by Abramson and associates,3 who stated3c that the dye was "deposited in the orifices of the sweat glands . . . (although histologic studies of this point have not been made)." On this experimental basis the theory has been advanced that the sweat glands are important avenues for the penetration of water-soluble substances into the skin. This theory contradicts experimental data indicating that the skin of the palms is only slightly permeable or completely impermeable to a number of water-soluble substances, such as dyes,4 allergens5 and histamine.6 The purpose of this study is to reexamine critically the question as to whether or not palmar pore patterns are sufficient

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