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Article
February 1951

LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS FOLLOWING LACERATION BY BROKEN GLASS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals, Dr. Eugene F. Traub, director.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1951;63(2):261-263. doi:10.1001/archderm.1951.01570020095016
Abstract

External irritation as a factor in the causation of lupus erythematosus was presented in a survey by David King-Smith1 some years ago. He discussed 18 cases in which the onset of the skin eruption was attributable to external irritation. In this series, seven cases followed direct burns (sun, hot fat, steam, water, radiant heat), seven were secondary to mustard gas dermatitis, one to a contact dermatitis from hair dye and two from direct laceration. During the intervening years, 1926 to the present, little direct evidence of the traumatic inception of lupus erythematosus has been advanced. The problem has importance not only from the standpoint of the disease condition but also from the medicolegal aspect. The latter aspect led to a thorough study of a case of lupus erythematosus the origin of which was unequivocally laceration due to broken glass.2

REPORT OF A CASE  F. F., a 44 year old

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