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Article
May 1951

DERMATITIS WITH LIPOMELANOTIC RETICULAR HYPERPLASIA OF LYMPH NODES: Report of Fifteen Cases

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Medical School, and Wesley Memorial Hospital and the Department of Dermatology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University and Mercy Hospital.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1951;63(5):611-621. doi:10.1001/archderm.1951.01570050069008
Abstract

THE ASSOCIATION of a peculiar type of hyperplasia of lymph nodes with chronic dermatitis was first fully discussed by Pautrier and Woringer1 in 1937. They reported 11 cases in which the lymph nodes on histological examination showed a peculiar type of hyperplasia. The dermatitis varied in type and degree but was usually erythematous, desquamative, of localized distribution and associated with pruritus. The lymph node hyperplasia was characterized by the multiplication of reticular cells, the presence of intracellular fat and melanin pigment and slight infiltration with eosinophils. In 1941 Soloff2 reported a case in which there were similar changes in the inguinal lymph nodes in a patient who died of disseminated miliary tuberculosis. In 1942 Hurwitt3 reviewed 12 cases in which there occurred generalized lymphadenopathy in association with a variety of chronic skin disorders characterized by pruritus. Clinically the cases were suspected of being possibly in the lymphoblastoma

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