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Article
June 1951

GENERALIZED HERPES ZOSTER: REPORT OF A CASE FOLLOWING ROENTGEN RAY THERAPY, ASSOCIATED WITH CHRONIC LYMPHATIC LEUKEMIA, LEUKEMIA CUTIS AND MIKULICZ'S SYNDROME

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1951;63(6):772-776. doi:10.1001/archderm.1951.01570060100013
Abstract

The association of herpes zoster with other diseases has always presented a fascinating study. As late as 1937 one author1 divided herpes zoster into two distinct groups: (1) idiopathic, or primary, zoster, due to a virus, and (2) symptomatic, or secondary, zoster, caused by various chronic infections, by toxic drugs and by blood diseases. We now think that in all types the disease is probably caused by a virus, the activation of which may be caused by a variety of stimuli. The relationship of this virus to varicella is still not clear, and the generalized form of the disease was early thought to be due to the fortuitous occurrence of zoster and chickenpox. It is now thought, however, that the generalized eruption represents an extension of the zoster itself. Just what the factors are which cause the disease to become generalized is not known.

The association of generalized herpes

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