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Article
October 1951

CUTANEOUS HYPERSENSITIVITY DUE TO BERYLLIUM: A Study of Thirteen Cases

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Department of Dermatology, Cleveland Clinic, and the Frank E. Bunts Educational Institute.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1951;64(4):470-482. doi:10.1001/archderm.1951.01570100087014
Abstract

DERMATITIS caused by beryllium compounds is one of the principal occupational hazards in beryllium-extraction plants. Gelman1 cited Pack as having observed a papulovesicular dermatitis on the exposed surfaces of workers engaged in the extraction of beryllium. Ulcers resembling those caused by chromates and dichromates occurred on the fingers of these workers. De Nardi2 reported 202 cases of dermatitis, 131 cases of tracheobronchitis, and 57 cases of pneumonitis from two beryllium-extraction plants near Cleveland during the period from 1940 to Jan. 17, 1950. Of the 202 cases of dermatitis, De Nardi lists 156 as due to beryllium fluoride (BeF2) and 45 as due to beryllium sulfate (BeSO4).3 Many of the workers who acquired the dermatitis also acquired conjunctivitis and rhinopharyngitis.

Van Ordstrand and De Nardi and associates4 observed that the skin and mucous membrane symptoms occurred in about 25% of the new employees

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