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Article
June 1952

DO ROENTGEN-RAY TREATMENTS AS GIVEN BY SKIN SPECIALISTS PRODUCE CANCERS OR OTHER SEQUELAE?Follow-Up Study of Dermatologic Patients Treated with Low-Voltage Roentgen Rays

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the New York University PostGraduate Medical School, Dr. Marion B. Sulzberger, Chairman, and the Skin and Cancer Unit of the University Hospital.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;65(6):639-655. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530250003001
Abstract

THIS REPORT deals with systematic follow-up and examination of the skin of persons who 5 to 23 years previously had received superficial low-voltage roentgen-ray treatments. The examinations were carried out by qualified specialists in dermatology in order to ascertain what, if any, harmful sequelae or other visible late effects had occurred.

The term superficial low-voltage roentgen-ray treatment is here used to designate the quality and dosage almost universally employed by skin specialists in hospitals, clinics, and private offices in the United States. In most dermatoses, the customary practice is to administer to any one area no more than 85 r weekly or 42.5 r once to twice weekly, up to a maximum total dose of about 1,400 r. These figures are based on dosages measured in air. The usual quality of irradiation used ranges from 60 to 100 kv., with half-value layers of about 0.5 to 1 mm.

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