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Article
July 1952

TINEA CAPITIS IN THE ADULT AND ADOLESCENT

Author Affiliations

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;66(1):9-40. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530260012002
Abstract

MY EXPERIENCE, as well as a geographic survey of the United States, indicates that the incidence of tinea capitis in the postpuberal person is higher than is generally realized. The physicians' index of suspicion regarding the possibility of tinea capitis in the adult has been lowered over the years by the medical literature emphasizing the rarity of this entity. This impression of rarity is partly due to the regional geographic distribution of the fungi capable of producing postpuberal tinea capitis, because of which dermatologists in some parts of the country very rarely see such patients. However, the ever-shifting incidence of such fungi, both locally and nationally, makes it important for the physicians in all sections of the country to appreciate the possibility of this clinical entity after puberty.

In 1925, Fox and Fowlkes1 reviewed the world literature on ringworm of the scalp in the adult, surveying

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