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Article
August 1952

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE SWEAT APPARATUS

Author Affiliations

HANOVER, N. H.

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, Dartmouth Medical School and Hitchcock Clinic.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;66(2):152-155. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530270010002
Abstract

THE RECENT developments in the physiology of sweating are numerous. Old concepts are strengthened, and new concepts are proposed. As in the past, many data are available on sweat gland function as it pertains to temperature regulation and acclimatization, to water and electrolyte balance, to nutrition and metabolism, and to functions of the vegetative nervous system.1 In recent years more attention is being focused on the sweat apparatus as a secreting unit. Because of the time and the type of this discussion, I have chosen to limit the material of this presentation to the recent developments in regard to the functioning of the sweat apparatus itself.2

More evidence is available that cholinergic drugs can excite eccrine sweat glands when introduced locally by injection or by ion transfer.3 Such sweating is produced in two ways—directly, by muscarine-like action, and reflexly, by nicotine-like action.4 In

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