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Article
August 1952

SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF GOLD DERMATITIS WITH CORTISONE GIVEN ORALLY

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;66(2):290. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530270140017

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Abstract

Although cortisone is not a panacea, it has been found to be useful in the treatment of a variety of diseases, including a number of cutaneous disorders. Record should be made of its benefits in different diseases when such are observed. My patient, suffering from gold dermatitis, improved rapidly while taking cortisone, after exhibiting no tendency to recover with symptomatic treatment for more than three months previously. Since gold dermatitis is potentially a dangerous disorder, the following report is made.

REPORT OF A CASE

Mrs. G. A., a 62-year-old white housewife, received injections of aurothioglucose (solganal® B in oil) for arthritis in three weekly treatments in May, 1951. The program was then interrupted until June 23, when weekly injections were again instituted. Late in July the patient complained of a sore mouth, with "blisters and raw spots." On Oct. 10, 1951, she received what proved to be

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