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Article
September 1952

CICATRIZING TINEA CAPITIS CAUSED BY TRICHOPHYTON RUBRUM (TRICHOPHYTON PURPUREUM)

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;66(3):363-366. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530280067010
Abstract

TINEA capitis, or ringworm of the scalp, may be caused by various species of the genera Microsporum and Trichophyton. These lesions are characterized by loss of hair in patches with or without vesicles and pustules and with a varying degree of inflammation. Some fungi, notably Trichophyton (Achorion) schoenleini and quinckeanum, Trichophyton violaceum, and Trichophyton sabouraudi may cause atrophy of the involved scalp tissue with resultant scarring. In those patients with kerion, scarring may result from the mishandling of the lesion. Kerion may be caused by many dermatophytes.1

Trichophyton rubrum (Trichophyton purpureum) is the cause of characteristic clinical lesions involving the nails, glabrous skin, and the hairy regions (axillae, groin, beard, and scalp). Tinea capitis caused by Trichophyton rubrum is as yet uncommon in the United States but is more prevalent in Japan and China.2 Three patients with tinea capitis due to this fungus have been observed in St.

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