[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1952

ULCERS OF THE LEG IN FELTY'S SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

From the Division of Dermatology, University of Minnesota, H. E. Michelson, M.D., Director, and the Department of Dermatology, Minneapolis General Hospital, Carl W. Laymon, M.D., Director.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;66(3):384-390. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530280088013
Abstract

FIVE CASES of chronic rheumatoid arthritis, splenomegaly, and leucopenia in middle-aged adults were described by Felty1 in 1924. Other somewhat inconsistent clinical features included slight secondary anemia, lymphadenopathy, lowgrade fever, weight loss, and yellowish-brown pigmentation and dusty nodules in the skin. Still2 previously had described a form of chronic arthritis occurring in children, accompanied with lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, but with leucocytosis rather than leucopenia. Chauffard and Raymond3 similarly had reported adenopathy occurring in adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, the somewhat confused literature has referred to a heterogeneous group of conditions as StillChauffard-Felty's disease.

There have been numerous reports of cases fitting Felty's original description.4 A statistical review of cases of rheumatoid arthritis supports Felty's original concept that the syndrome is a single pathologic process caused by a noxa which affects the joints, spleen, and leucocytes. However, such a review questions the

×