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Article
October 1952

FURTHER STUDIES OF THE MOSAIC FUNGUS

Author Affiliations

EDMONTON, ALTA., CANADA

From the Provincial Laboratory of Public Health, University of Alberta. This investigation was made possible by financial assistance from the Dominion of Canada Department of Health.

AMA Arch Derm Syphilol. 1952;66(4):470-477. doi:10.1001/archderm.1952.01530290046006
Abstract

IN CLEARED preparations of skin taken from mycotic lesions, one often finds patches of refractile debris arranged in a network. This is the much-discussed "mosaic fungus." It is illustrated in a scale from a mycotic lesion on the palm of the hand (Fig. 2A).

The filaments of the mosaic fungus may be from 4.5 to 12 μ in width. In small mosaic deposits, the central filaments are the widest while the peripheral ones are narrow and attenuated. The network is composed of linearly arranged segments, sometimes short and rectangular, sometimes long and sinuous.

Some believe that the mosaic fungus is the result of fungus infection; others, that it has no connection with mycosis. A number of years ago, Dowding and Orr summarized conflicting views about it in the Archives.1 The present article is an account of observations carried out since that time.

ITS NATURE—FIVE INTERPRETATIONS

1. Cholesterol.—When

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